This 2009 Dodge Viper ACR Has Barely Been Driven

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12-year-old American classic is practically brand new.

The Dodge Viper requires no introduction. But very sadly it's gone (despite some unsold examples floating around) and there are no plans to bring it back, at least in its famed naturally aspirated V10, six-speed manual setup. From now on, future high-performance sports cars will receive some level of electrification. Ferrari's first pure EV, for example, is due in 2025. But the Viper was nothing like a Ferrari, past or present. It was Carroll Shelby's late twentieth-century update of the Cobra he created a few decades prior, and it was only natural for the Viper to hit the track. Dodge went all in, hence track-focused Viper variants like the SRT-10 ACR.

ACR, or American Club Racer, is the track-ready though still street-legal version of the fourth-generation Viper.

Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions
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Mecum Auctions

The ACR X was its more powerful, track-only counterpart, and very soon you can own one with just 930 miles on its odometer. This 2009 Dodge Viper SRT-10 ACR is being auctioned off with no reserve at the Mecum Auction Indianapolis event next month. Despite its track attitude, it still contains creature comforts like air conditioning, AM/FM stereo with a CD player, and leather-upholstered seats.

But the ACR was not for the beginner driver. It still came equipped with the standard Viper's 8.4-liter V10 with 600 horsepower and 560 lb-ft of torque paired to a six-speed manual, but engineers concentrated on handling improvements rather than increasing output, yet they still increased top speed to 180 mph. A number of aero enhancements were the result, such as a carbon fiber front splitter, an adjustable carbon fiber rear wing, and front canards.

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These elements not only improved cornering but also generated 1,000 pounds of downforce at 150 mph. That front splitter alone is a piece of fine art. It features three removable protective wear-resistant rub strips and stainless steel tension cables. The heavy doses of carbon fiber shaved some 80 pounds compared to the standard SRT-10. A sport suspension system with fully adjustable coilover racing shocks, a stiffer sway bar, and slotted rotors in the Brembo brakes, were all required in order to handle all that additional downforce. A set of Michelin Sport Cup tires rounded off the list of upgrades.

A Viper ACR in perfect condition with less than 1,000 miles is going to command quite a price tag. Mecum estimates it'll bring in between $125,000 and $150,000, when it crosses the block at the Indy 2021 auction from May 14-22.

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Source Credits: Mecum Auctions

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