This Bugatti EB110 SS Prototype Is Much Cheaper Than A Chiron

Auction

And most Veyrons, for that matter.

It’s only been in recent years that Bugatti has found financial stability, thanks to the VW Group. Before that, however, Bugatti struggled for years, but in 1991 an Italian businessman named Romano Artioli bought the brand and gave it a shot. His efforts were noble and resulted in the EB110 and, shortly thereafter, the EB110 SS. Compared to the “standard” EB110, the EB110 SS was even more powerful and achieved a top speed of 216 mph. Only 36 examples were built, along with the prototype that's heading to RM Auctions Paris event in February.

Built in early 1993, this car was meant to be used for body development purposes and later for homologation testing. At first the prototype was fitted with two-wheel drive but later received all-wheel drive as well as a new engine. That engine, a quad-turbo 3.5-liter V12, was previously used for the EB110 GT prototype that set the world speed record of 213 mph in 1992. Following this, Bugatti used the prototype to help solve an engine issue on the factory-spec EB110 regarding fuel delivery. Once solved, Bugatti then added a revised gear shifter and a lightweight carbon fiber engine cover, but none of these improvements were carried over to other EB110s.

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Bugatti under Artioli went into administration in 1995, when this EB110 SS prototype was sold to its first private owner in the Netherlands where it has remained until 2015. It was then bought by the consignor and later displayed at the Salon Prive where it received best in class. Needless to say, it’s in concours condition and has only 2,050 miles on its clock. RM Sotheby’s believes it’ll fetch somewhere in the neighborhood of 850,000 and 1,100,000 Euros, far cheaper than any new Chiron, new or lightly used. Photos courtesy of Tim Scott/RM Sotheby’s.

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