This Ferrari-Powered Formula One Replica Is Road Legal

Formula 1

Each example is expected to cost around $725,000.

With the Aston Martin Valkyrie and Mercedes-AMG Project One incorporating technology typically used in F1 cars, the next generation of hypercars might as well be race cars for the road. If you want something closer to the real thing, over in Australia a pair of ambitious engineers are building a Formula One replica that can be driven on the road. For added authenticity, it’s powered by a Ferrari engine.

Work on the Formula One road car, dubbed the Zacaria, began two years ago and is expected to be finished later this year. It’s being developed by Zac Mihajlovic, who previously built a road-legal version of the Batmobile from Tim Burton’s 1989 Batman film, with the help of motorcycle builder Scotty Cox.

“So I thought, what’s the next-most extreme thing I could build to drive on the street? No one’s done it with an F1 car, they’ve done thing like the BAC Mono or the Ariel Atom, but they’re four-cylinder and look like concept cars,” he told Which Car. “If you wanted to drive a real F1 car it’d take a team of people to run it so I thought about a modern V8 or V12 from a Ferrari, there’s probably a market for people who want something no one else has.”

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The engine is a 6.3-liter V12 sourced from a wrecked 2014 F12 Berlinetta in the UK. It’s paired to a transaxle six-speed transmission from Albins, a company that builds the gearboxes used in Australia’s Supercars racing series. Mihajlovic says the 6.3-liter engine is perfect for an F1-inspired road car, and expects the power-to-weight to be roughly 1:1.

“The engine puts out around 740 horsepower, and the car should weigh around 700 kg without a driver in the car,” he explained. “With the straight-cut gearbox you lose almost no power. Maybe with a tank of fuel and a driver it’d be about one-to-one, which is rare for a street car.”

The car also features a polished aluminium body left unpainted so you don’t have to worry about body blemishes and a hydraulic lift system. Mihajlovic expects to sell each completed Zacaria for over one million Australian dollars, which translates to around $725,000 USD.

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