This Is How The Lamborghini Huracan Evo Is Born

Supercars / Comments

A lot has to go right to successfully produce a quarter-million-dollar supercar.

If you've ever wondered what goes into producing a quarter-million-dollar Italian supercar like the Lamborghini Huracan Evo, we've got just the thing to sate your curiosity.

A recent 49-minute documentary from WELT takes us behind-the-scenes at Lamborghini's Sant'Agata Bolognese assembly plant to see how the Huracan Evo, currently the brand's "entry-level" model, goes from bare chassis to resplendent sports car. "Entry-level" though the car may be, the Huracan Evo is, of course, far from basic, with the same mid-mounted, naturally aspirated 631-horsepower V10 as the Huracan Performante, rear-wheel steering, and a sophisticated torque-vectoring system.

For a car of such technological sophistication, the assembly process looks surprisingly familiar.

The Lamborghini Huracan Evo is the result of a mid-cycle refresh to the marque's V10-powered Huracan, which was introduced in 2014 as a replacement for the hot-selling Gallardo.

But it's not just the Huracan Evo that this WELT documentary delves into. Along the way, the producers also speak with a few VIPs like Lamborghini's Chief Manufacturing Officer Ranieri Niccoli, Head of Design Mitja Borkert, racing driver Mirko Bortolotti, and Team Manager Gottfried Grasser, about topics ranging from the production process to design, to the marque's racing performance, to what, after all, makes a Lamborghini a Lamborghini.

It's really an excellent watch if you're a fan of Italy's storied raging bull sports car manufacturer.

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WELT Documentary
WELT Documentary
WELT Documentary

There's still more excitement in store for the Lamborghini Huracan in the months and years to come. Most notably, Lamborghini is thought to be working on a higher performance Huracan Evo Performante with more power, a lighter curb weight, and more advanced aerodynamics. Rumors suggest it could be dubbed the Huracan "STO", or "Super Trofeo Omologato".

That name is a nod to the Lamborghini Blancpain Super Trofeo racing series that's run all across the globe. Considering the discontinued Huracan Performante rockets to 62 mph in just 2.9 seconds and runs the quarter-mile in a jaw-dropping 2.9, Lamborghini has set the bar high, but recent photos suggest it might well be a race car for the road.

WELT Documentary
WELT Documentary

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