This Is How You Slam A Square Body Chevy Truck

Tuning / Comments

This custom chassis has it all.

America is the land of the pickup truck. Nowhere else do people love these big lumbering vehicles more, and the aftermarket scene is absolutely massive. One of the most popular trucks to modify is the classic square body Chevy. The modern Chevrolet Silverado is a nice truck, but newer trucks lack the road presence of these retro machines, and no one knows that better than Roadster Shop, a restoration and modification outfit that specializes in classic trucks. Roadster Shop is famous for selling virtually brand-new square body trucks with 650 horsepower V8 engines, and its latest product is sure to draw the attention of GM truck fans across the nation. Roadster Shop is now offering a custom chassis that allows modders to slam late '80s and '90s GM pickups, right to the floor.

Roadster Shop
Roadster Shop
Roadster Shop
Roadster Shop

How does this work? Well, the Roadster Shop starts off by getting rid of the solid rear axle and replacing it with an independent system. This is virtually an all-new chassis and makes use of a blend of factory GM parts and custom Roadster Shop bits. All the builder needs to add is a bed, cab, and their drivetrain of choice. "It is designed as a bolt-on chassis with very minimal body modifications," says Roadster Shop's Phil Gerber. "The frame retains all of the factory bumper, core support, body, and bed mounts." To get these trucks to sit extra low, the shop made the front dampers sit remotely by connecting them to the control arms via various linkages, and the rear shocks are situated behind the trailing arms for added tuck. The bed of the truck can also remain as low as possible thanks to a cantilever setup.

Roadster Shop
Roadster Shop
Roadster Shop
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Parts such as the wheel bearings, front brake spindles, and brake mounts are still factory GM bits from the C7 Chevrolet Corvette. All of these bits combined equate to a chassis that can be lowered to the frame rails, but remain functional when the air suspension is raised. Gerber claims that you can expect a ride height of up to 8.5 inches when fully raised. One of these frames (including the suspension setup) will set you back a cool $34,995, but Roadster Shop also offers custom brake setups and air ride systems to get the ball rolling even quicker. Trucks are supposed to be functional things, but if slamming one is made this easy, then there's only one way to go: down.

Roadster Shop
Roadster Shop
Roadster Shop
Roadster Shop

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