Testing

THIS Is The First Car To Pass The Real World MPG Test?

Obviously, they weren't flooring the throttle at any point.

With a new testing regime to calculate 'official' MPG figures on public roads set to replace the procedure we currently use in controlled laboratories, it's understandable why many are expecting fuel economy statistics to plummet when our contemporary system is eventually phased out for good. At least, that's what we all thought, as Aston Martin's stunned everyone by being the only car company to actually surpass its real world MPG targets.

According to Emissions Analytics (the independent body that conducted these real world tests), the Aston Martin V8 Vantage was the only vehicle it analyzed in this procedure that was able to beat its "official" mpg figure - as in, the one gathered from those controlled lab tests we mentioned earlier. Granted, being a gallon per mile more efficient isn't something to be too celebratory over (Emissions Analytics measured an average of 21.5 mpg, versus the manufacturer's claim of 20.5 mpg), but it's still a pretty commendable achievement. Even if it's yet more proof to demonstrate how utterly bogus the fuel economy testing procedure we currently have is.

With the only 'winner' being the Aston Martin, it's no shock to know that no other car tested by Emissions Analytics was able to match its manufacturer claims. For instance, though the Honda Civic's 61.8 mpg is still impressive, it falls someway short of the 78.5 mpg that the vehicle was able to achieve in controlled testing. Perhaps the biggest offender of them all, though, was the BMW X5, with its pitiful 16.2 mpg being considerably off the claimed 25.4 mpg it's capable of achieving. As stated earlier in the article, though the Aston Martin is proof these mpg figures can improve, real world tests will likely see such results be the exception rather than the rule.

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Aston Martin Vantage Coupe
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