Unique Mercedes G-Class Revealed With Coach Doors

Tuning / Comments

It's part of a super-opulent package that also includes massaging and reclining rear seats.

Question: do you consider the Mercedes-Benz G-Class a rugged, well-engineered off-roader, or an opulent and luxurious around-town SUV for wealthy city-dwellers? How you answer will affect how you perceive the latest G-Wagen customization package from noted German Mercedes tuner Hoefele Design, which features rear-hinged "coach" doors - or "suicide" doors, as they're sometimes called.

Coach doors have become quite rare, so Hoefele's take on the Mercedes G-Class, which is named the "Ultimate HG", places the high-priced SUV on a rather exclusive list. But beyond the bragging rights and "wow" factor, there's a reason some of the world's ritziest cars still sometimes offer coach doors: ease of ingress. It's simply much more pleasant climbing into the second row through a rear-hinged door than through a front-hinged one.

Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design

Granted, Hoefele's G-Wagen package doesn't end with the perfectly-executed coach door conversion; the Ultimate HG also boasts positively gargantuan 23-inch wheels with low-profile tires, a fetching custom front bumper with plenty of razzle-dazzle, an upscale Maybach-like grille with a big Hoefele emblem in the center, and some subtle-looking rooftop auxiliary lights.

You know: for all the off-roading you're going to do with your low-profile Pirelli P Zeros.

Beside that, the Ultimate HG package includes a set of heated and cooled massaging and reclining rear seats, with a bespoke console between them replete with touchscreen and wireless phone charger.

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Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design

Hoefele Design hasn't been forthcoming with a price for its luxurious G-Wagen treatment, but we're guessing it costs a pretty penny; Ford's luxury brand, Lincoln, sold a limited run of coach door-converted Continental sedans, each one costing some $40,000 more than the Lincoln Continental Black Label it was based on in the final year of production. Altering a car's structure - and more importantly, doing it right - costs a pretty penny.

But then, if you're already the sort of person who can afford a brand new G-Class and cover the cost of shipping it to Europe for modifications, you're probably doing alright.

Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design
Hoefele Design

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