US Military Tests Hydrogen-Powered Chevrolet Silverado

Hydrogen Car

Unlike the original Colorado-based concept, the Silverado ZH2 can still be used as a traditional pickup.

A few years ago, a partnership between General Motors and the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center resulted in the development of a hydrogen-powered Chevrolet Colorado pickup, which has been undergoing testing by the military to see if it's feasible to use fuel cell technology in future vehicles. While hydrogen-powered vehicles aren’t normally associated with weapons of war, they bring many tactical advantages such as noise-free operation, low-end torque, and “exportable” fuel production.

Testing must have been successful because new photos have surfaced on Instagram via allcarnews showing what appears to be a hydrogen-powered pickup truck concept based on the Chevrolet Silverado being tested as part of General Motors’ new GM Defense Division.

The original Colorado-based concept was capable of outputting 25 kW (33 hp) of continuous power, producing potable fresh water as a by-product of making electricity. However, the bed space had to be removed to make room for the hydrogen tanks. According to a report by Jane’s, the new ZH2 Silverado platform is a dedicated platform the retains the functionality of a pickup truck, meaning the rear of the platform can be used as flatbed space or configured like a typical pickup truck.

You Might Also Like
Why We Really Need Supercars
Why We Really Need Supercars
8 Modified Range Rover Nightmares
8 Modified Range Rover Nightmares

It is also capable of outputting 100 kW (134 hp) of continuous power and generate two gallons of potable fresh water per hour. The larger dedicated fuel cell platform can also handle heavier payloads than the original ZH2 based on the Colorado platform and has over 400 miles of range that takes three minutes to fill up.

From the photos we can see that the hydrogen-powered Silverado has an aggressive design with LED lights, rugged body panels, and multimatic DSSV shocks. Only one test example has been made, which the government reportedly paid $4 million for.

Gallery

9
PHOTOS