Volkswagen Beetle Decorated With Millions Of Beads Is A Mexican Beauty

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It apparently links Mexico's past and present.

The majority of the human population will be able to recognize the shapely curves and cute face of the Volkswagen Beetle. This ubiquitous little people mover has been around for over half a century and continues to frequent the roads of countries across the globe. The humble Beetle has become much more than a car and has taken on a cult-like persona by featuring on album covers, starring in TV commercials, and representing an entire cultural movement in the 1960s. These days people still love to modify these cars, some go through extensive restorations, and others, such as this Beetle, go through a transformative process to become a piece of rolling art. This trippy Beetle is called the "Vochol", a combination of the word "Vocho", a popular term for Volkswagen Beetles in Mexico, and "Huichol," a term used for the Wixarika indigenous group in western Mexico.

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Volkswagen
Volkswagen
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This 1990 Beetle has been adorned with millions of beads, paying tribute to the culture and heritage of the Huichol people who used beads made from shells, seeds and other natural materials to adorn masks, bowls, and other items. Public and private organizations commissioned this project back in 2010 and a team of eight artists from two Huichol families spent eight months crafting this car. On the hood of the Vochol are two snakes wrapped in clouds, which represents rain. On the sides of the car, deer, birds, scorpions, and peyote flowers bring life to the profile of this Beetle. The roof features a large sun which symbolizes the union between humans and gods. The Phrases "200 years of Independence" and "100 years since the Mexican Revolution" are written out in Wixarika on the fenders.

Volkswagen
Volkswagen
Volkswagen

The finished product makes use of about 2,277,000 beads, and represents over 9,000 hours of work. This amazing creation was unveiled at a museum in Guadalajara, Mexico, and was showcased in Mexico City, and was later shipped to the US, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. When not on the move, this 1990 Vocho occupies a special spot at the Museo de Arte Popular in Mexico City.

Volkswagen
Volkswagen
Volkswagen

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