Why Spend $3 Million On A New Countach When The Original Is So Much Cheaper?

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Would you rather buy the 2022 Countach for $3 million, or a 1984 model for $900,000?

The 2022 Lamborghini Countach is a highly divisive supercar, yet there was enough demand to sell the total 112-unit allocation. The original Countach's designer is not a fan, and our office is split right down the middle as to whether it's a beautiful machine.

These Sian-based cars were reportedly sold for $2.3 million each, but their values increased dramatically within a few months. One extremely optimistic car flipper even asked $7 million for this rare piece of metal.

It's safe to say you won't get one for less than $3 to $4 million at this point, so why buy the latest version when you can have the original icon for a third of the price? Or wait a few months until a better Countach comes along.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

A stunning Bianco (white) 1984 Lamborghini Countach LP5000 S by Bertone will go up for auction at RM Sotheby's Monterey event later this month. It's a no reserve sale, and the car is expected to fetch between $700,000 to $900,000. That's an absolute bargain compared to the new car.

The LP5000 S was introduced in 1982 and it boasted several significant enhancements. Lamborghini increased the original 3.9-liter naturally aspirated V12 engine to 4.8 liters, fed by six Weber carburetors. The smaller V12 produced 350 horsepower, while the bored-out V12 gained an additional 25 horses.

Only 321 were built, making it one of the more exclusive Countach models offered during the car's 16-year run.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
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This particular example was dry-stored in the UK for several years and only has 5,495 kilometers (3,434 miles) on the clock. It's not one of the ultra-rare right-hand drive models, so you can easily use it in the States.

The previous owner acquired the car in 2002 from a Swiss owner who purchased it new. It landed in the current owner's lap in 2006 but was only registered for road use in 2009. It spent most of its time as part of a car collection and was rarely driven.

Even so, the Countach is infamous for being a finicky supercar, so it was delivered to the UK-Based DK Engineering to get it fit for sale. The owner spent more than £26,000 ($32,000) to strip-clean the carburetors, replace the master brake cylinder, adjust the timing chain, and replace the cooling pipes.

It's now looking for a new owner, and if we had to choose between this or a new one, we know which icon we'd be parking in the garage.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

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