Win a 700hp 1964 Pontiac GTO-R

Tuning

American tuner Raybestos Garage has hooked up a 1964 Pontiac GTO-R with 700hp.

Described by one of the builders as a “this side of street legal” race car, the boys at Raybestos Garage completely transformed a 1964 Pontiac GTO-R into a modern day beast on the streets. The GTO is equipped with a powerful LSX 454 engine, Tremec six-speed manual transmission, reverse-sweep 180mph speedometer, Moser 9-inch rear-end and a custom fabricated body and suspension. 700hp plow out of the 7.4-liter GM LSX crate engine and about $20,000 worth of Raybestos NASCAR brakes help keep the classic -turned-modern ride in check.

The street-legal GTO can hit 128mph on a quarter-mile run. The best part of this '64 Pontiac is that it's being given away for free. All you have to do is sign up on Raybestos' site for free and wait for the drawing on September 15th.

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