World's First 100% Exposed Carbon Fiber McLaren 720S

Tuning / Comments

3D printing makes this a very interesting kit.

When it comes to aftermarket customization, even those driving supercars like to get creative and put a little of their own taste into the design of a car. It's for this reason that companies like 1016 Industries exist, and it's why the tuner can let its hair down with crazy builds like a Lamborghini Urus with green carbon fiber. But lately, 1016 has been pushing boundaries with 3D printing and has created a kit for the Ferrari F8 Tributo using the tech. Then late last year, we saw a prototype of the tuner's 3D printed kit for the McLaren 720S. At that stage, it wasn't much of a looker, but just check it out now!

1016 Industries
1016 Industries
1016 Industries
1016 Industries

Based on the carbon fiber Lamborghini Huracan Evo that 1016 built a while back, we knew that the kit had potential. 1016 is calling this a showcase of the future of elite manufacturing. The tuner goes on to say that "the 1016 Industries 000 720S is the first car to ever successfully integrate a completely exposed carbon fiber exterior and 3D printed parts into a fully operational, scalable design." The vehicle's exterior is made entirely of exposed carbon, but functional 3D printed parts feature in the inner bumper structures, aerodynamic ducting, and linkage in the wing kit so that everything works as it should.

1016 Industries
1016 Industries
1016 Industries
1016 Industries
Best Movie Car Chases Of 2020
Best Movie Car Chases Of 2020
Remembering 2020's Craziest Hypercars
Remembering 2020's Craziest Hypercars

As a result, weight on this car has dropped by 268 pounds, but the point of this exercise wasn't just to create a bespoke one-off for one client. Rather, the 000 project was undertaken so that 1016 Industries could prove that adapting 3D printed tech into scaled manufacturing processes was possible, Basically, the lessons learned in developing this kit will be applied to future offerings, thus increasing the use of 3D printing, lowering weight, and improving customization options. With more efficient processes proving that 3D printing is now a viable endeavor for these kits, you can expect to see many more wild designs in the future. But with this project costing CEO Peter Northrop $550,000, it won't be attainable for everyone.

1016 Industries
1016 Industries
1016 Industries
1016 Industries
1016 Industries
1016 Industries

Join The Discussion

Gallery

20
Photos