You'll Soon Be Able To Buy A Volkswagen Diesel Again In The US

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Question is, will anyone even want one?

We all know just about everything there is to know about the Volkswagen Dieselgate scandal, which is finally coming to an end. Settlements have been agreed upon and affected owners are resolving their claims. But there’s the still the question about what to do with all of the diesel-powered 2015 VW’s that were properly repaired with EPA approval. Should they be sold? Yes, according to a new report from Automotive News. The EPA has just given its permission for VW to sell those leftover 2015 model year diesel vehicles in the US.

Obviously all of them include all diesel engine hardware and software fixes. "We are finalizing the details of this program and will provide more information on its implementation at the appropriate time," stated a VW America spokeswoman. In September 2015, VW admitted to equipping some 500,000 diesel vehicles with cheat software in order to pass US emissions tests. In light of that discovery, VW worked with US regulators to make the necessary fixes, as well as shelling out billions of dollars in fines and compensation to owners. So, question is, should you considering buying a late model Volkswagen diesel?

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Yes, if you’re looking for a good deal, respectable fuel economy and, perhaps this is the most important thing for some, if you don’t care about what VW did wrong. Jalopnik also just got a hold of some drone footage showing the sheer number of diesel cars VW bought back, now sitting at the Pontiac Silverdome in Michigan.

There are a total of 67,000 diesels from 2015 that will likely soon be for sale, 12,000 of which are already on dealership lots. You should also know that a portion of these vehicles include those repurchased from owners through that settlement. Other vehicles were never sold to begin with due to the 2015 stop-sale order. What’s clear, however, is that VW won’t be building all-new diesels, more than likely, ever again. It now just wants to unload 67,000 of them quickly.

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