You'll Never Guess What Powers This Track-Ready Porsche 911

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Good ol' American horsepower!

Apart from being absolutely outstanding to drive with the motorsports record to back it up, the Porsche 911 is mostly known for two things: its rear-engine layout, and its flat-six engine. That engine is integral to its magic, the design giving it vertically compact packaging with a low center of gravity to minimize any ill effects on the handling.

But in case you couldn't have guessed, Porsche engines are, generally, quite expensive to rebuild or replace when they fail. That might have played a part in one Type-997 Porsche 911 owner's choice to replace their grenaded flat-six not with the original motor, but an LS7.

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TK Autosports
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If you follow domestic performance cars at all, you know the LS7. It's the perky, 505-horsepower 7.0L V8 that Chevrolet dropped in the C6 Corvette Z06 and, later, the last Camaro Z/28. Like all Chevy small-blocks, it's externally compact and easy to drop in just about anywhere - like, say, into the back end of a 997. But unlike most other small-blocks, it also has an impressively high redline of 7,000 rpm, thanks to bits like titanium intake valves and con rods, and hollow sodium-filled exhaust valve stems.

This swap was performed by the experts at TK Autosports in Millville, New Jersey, using a lot of ready-made parts from Renegade Hybrids, which is the go-to shop for Porsche LS-swap components.

TK Autosports
TK Autosports
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TK Autosports

At 505 horsepower, the Chevy LS7 is even more potent than the twin-turbocharged 3.6L flat-6 that powered the Type 997 911 Turbo, which was rated at 473 horsepower. What's more, it should also grace this 911 with the predictable, linear throttle response that naturally aspirated engines are known for; turbos are great, but no matter what you do to mitigate lag, it can never be totally eliminated. And since it's very clearly a track car, with a roll cage, a digital instrument panel, and a big ole rear wing, that might be worth the price of admission alone.

good life 777
good life 777
good life 777
good life 777

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