Model Overview

2018 Lamborghini Huracan RWD Coupe Review

In the world of the supercar, pecking order is paramount. Every horsepower and acceleration statistic is vital in order to ensure that magazine covers and website headlines are dominated by the latest and greatest. So then why would Lamborghini release something with less power and performance in such a cut-throat environment?

Well, informed motoring enthusiasts know that big numbers don’t always equate to the most engaging driving experience and that is where the Huracan RWD Coupe comes in, it may have slightly less power but its two-wheel drive layout gives it a balance and delicacy that is lacking in the rest of the all-wheel drive range.

What’s it like inside?

The Huracan offers a low and wide cockpit with good forward visibility and well-bolstered seats. Getting in requires some athleticism but that is the price to pay for sitting a few inches from the ground.

The interior is covered in high quality leather, plastic and carbon fiber accents. Some minor controls and buttons bear a resemblance to other VW Group products but those familiar with Lamborghinis of old will be pleased to know that the switchgear and electronics have been left to the Germans.

A digital dashboard and aircraft style center console toggles and dials give the Huracan a special feel and the wide range of personalization options are available. Cargo and oddments space is very limited and the front trunk does not allow for much more than one or two small bags.

How does it drive?

It may share some of its componentry with the Audi R8 but that is no bad thing and the Huracan exhibits a heightened level of dynamism and immediacy from the helm that brings it that much closer to the benchmark Ferrari 488.

The lighter curb weight and rear-wheel drive make for a sharper turn-in and more natural weight transfer when getting back on the power too. Of course power on oversteer is now far more likely when getting over exuberant with the loud pedal and while skilled drivers will no doubt enjoy this trait, in slippery conditions the all-wheel drive system in the standard Huracan Coupe LP 610-4 makes for far quicker progress around tight bends.

The ride quality is adjustable but remains firm and the Huracan RWD Coupe is at its best on smooth and flowing roads.

What about the performance?

The Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 RWD Coupe is equipped with a 5.2-liter V10 engine and in this application has been tuned to produce 571 horsepower and 398 lb-ft of torque. Power is sent to the rear wheels through a 7-speed dual-clutch transmission.

Acceleration off the line is limited more by the reduced grip available from the two-wheel drive layout rather than the slight reduction in power and the LP 580-2 trails its stablemates to 60 mph by a few tenths of a second. Still, its 3.3-second time is indecently quick and in-gear acceleration remains virtually immediate in any gear.

The lack of a turbocharger means quicker low-down throttle response a more linear power delivery and the un-muted exhaust note plays a symphony that may be worth the Huracan’s price tag all on its own.

The Ferrari 488 and other turbocharged competition may punch harder in the mid-range but the way this V10 keeps chasing the redline and the immediacy of the throttle response make the driving experience quite intoxicating.

What are my options?

The Huracan RWD Coupe may be the entry level Lamborghini but it offers a decent level of standard equipment. Standard items include 19-inch alloys, 12.3-inch interactive cockpit display, heated and powered external mirrors, leather interior and selectable driving modes.

Notable available options include Carbon ceramic brakes, nose-lift system, cruise control, rearview camera, navigation and advanced adaptive dampers. A huge range of customization options allow for detailed personalization by the owner.

The Verdict

Lamborghini should be applauded for introducing a model into its range that will be judged on its handling ability rather than its headline figures.

The inevitable comparison to other rear-wheel drive benchmarks may find it lacking in some quarters but that naturally aspirated engine and the much improved driving dynamics over its all-wheel drive stablemates will surely appeal to a broader range of supercar enthusiasts.

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Starting MSRP
$199,800

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Lamborghini Huracan RWD Coupe
Starting MSRP
$199,800
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